Category : Media

Media

‘A fascinating glimpse at a woman behind the success of the first moon landing.’ Waking Brain Cells reviews Alison Donald’s Supersonic Picture Book

Tasha at Waking Brain Cells has written an out-of-this-world review of Alison Donald‘s non-fiction picture book, The Spacesuit:

This nonfiction picture book tells the very interesting story of how the spacesuits for the moon landing were invented and designed. The interplay of engineers and seamstresses where everyone’s ideas were valid is an important piece. The focus on comfort as well as functionality made their suit the winner as well as a willingness to work very hard to get it finished in time.

The art in the book pays homage to sewing by incorporating pins, images that look sewn on, and even a timeline made of thread. The illustrations are bright with throwbacks to the 1960’s too. The combination is bright and hopeful.

Based on the true story, this picture book is “sew” good. Appropriate for ages 5-8.

Thank You!
Read Tasha’s full review here!
Buy a copy here in the UK or in the US here!

Read More
Media

Mr B’s B-rilliant review of New Junior Fiction, The Stolen Spear

Mr B Guided Reading has reviewed Saviour Pirotta‘s Brand New Junior Fiction, The Stolen Spear with illustrations by Davide Ortu:

Saviour Pirotta and Maverick Publishing have produced this exceptional story, set in the Late Neolithic period where man has learnt how to grow crops, keep farm animals and live as communities.
Although this book is a work of fiction, Pirotta does an outstanding job of drawing realistic links to the Neolithic era and what it was like.
It’s a story intertwined with Neolithic themes of spirit, hope and bravery, all of which Early Man had to exhibit to survive.

Grab this book when you get the chance. It’s a Stone-Age adventure of thrills, spills and excitement.

Thank you!
Read the full review here and buy a copy here!

Read More
Media

Yo Ho Ho and a bottle of orange squash… Library Girl and Book Boy review The Pirate Who Lost His Name

Jo at Library Girl and Book Boy has left a beauty of a review about Lou Treleaven‘s book The Pirate Who Lost His Name with illustrations by Genie Espinosa:

There’s a very piratey pirate who has everything he needs: a parrot, an eyepatch, a boat. But one thing is missing and he just can’t find it – his name! No matter how hard he tries, he just can’t remember and nobody else’s seems to be able to help him either!

Captain Dreamboat couldn’t help, the pirate barber can’t help, but maybe his parrot knows something?

My boys loved meeting the whole pirate team and finding out more about them. They both coveted Pirate Anorak’s immense treasure mound! They were also both screaming at the book by the end I’d be the story as they’d worked out what the poor forgetful pirate’s name was. Lots of fun with illustrations which make the characters leap off the pages. 3+

Thank You!
Read the full Books Ahoy review here and buy a copy here!

Read More
Media

‘An introduction to the concept of sharing which should prompt some discussion with young readers.’ Father Reading shouts Mine! about Alex English’s Mine Mine Mine! Said the Porcupine

Kieron and T at Father Reading Every Day SHARE their review of Mine Mine Mine! Said the Porcupine by Alex English with illustrations by Emma Levey:

A simple, recognisable story about the struggle to get children to share their toys. Parents will recognise Porcupine well but there is perhaps a missed opportunity with the final message as Porcupine doesn’t learn the error of his ways – he is more lucky that Alfie is a nice boy. The illustrations are a lot of fun – particularly Porcupine’s sneaky face and ingenuity collecting toys!

An introduction to the concept of sharing which should prompt some discussion with young readers. T mainly enjoyed admiring Alfie’s impressive range of toys and told me, “I would like a rocket ship and dinosaur.”

Thank you!
Read the full review here and pre-order the New Edtion here!

Read More
Media

‘A MONSTER of a book that will leave you not wanting to drink any carrot juice … or will it?’ What’s Good To Read reviews Buttercup Sunshine and The House on Hangman’s Hill

David at What’s Good to Read has had a THRILLING time reading Colin Mulhern’s second book in the Buttercup Sunshine series; The House on Hangman’s Hill

Overall, the second book in this comedy horror series for children has continued in the same fun and scary vein as the first. It sees the delightful Buttercup encounter a weird new adventure in a cleverly and thrilling way and a great use of language that will not overwhelm its young readers.

The pages are littered with black and white drawings, adding a bit more illustrated humour to the story with its short chapters, making it easier to read for those slightly reluctant readers.

With brains in jars, mad scientists, zombies and cute bunny rabbits roaming around places like the Misty Marshes of Misery, My Gawd We’re All Going To Die Swamp and Hangman’s Hill, what more of a fun filled thrilling adventure could a reader of junior fiction need?

Buttercup Sunshine and the House on Hangman’s Hill is fantastic fun, mixing children’s comedy horror with the classic Frankenstein story, creating a fun, witty and engaging story with just the right amount of frights for its target audience.

Thank you!
Read the full review here and buy a copy here!

Read More
Media

‘A brilliant twist, and one that had my seven year old in stitches!’ The Ish Mother cheers ‘Book-Ahoy’ for Lou Treleaven’s The Pirate Who Lost His Name

Bec at The Ish Mother has written a treasure of a review for Lou Treleaven‘s book The Pirate Who Lost His Name with illustrations by Genie Espinosa:

Pirate stories are always a winner with young children, and the eponymous but anonymous pirate in this book is a really likable character – his embarrassment at forgetting his own name is endearing, and you can tell that he is a very friendly pirate too as he goes to visit his friends on his quest. I won’t give the ending away but it’s a brilliant twist, and one that had my seven year old in stitches!

The writing is very witty, with lots of funny pirate names to get the little ones giggling, and the illustrations are a great match – colourful, over the top and full of quirky details to spot. Each pirate is drawn with great care to match their name and to make you laugh. My daughter particularly liked that there were female pirates too! I think the parrot was my three year old’s favourite character though, and a very expressive parrot it is! He loved finding him in the different illustrations.

If you have a pirate-lover in your family, or just a lover of witty words and funny pictures, then this book would be a big hit!

Thank you Bec!

Read the full review here and buy a copy here!

Read More
Media

‘A must for every bookshelf’ My Book Corner reviews I, Pod! by Rebecca Lisle

Sarah at My Book Corner has written a rocking book review for Rebecca Lisle‘s book I, Pod! with illustrations by Richard Watson.

‘I, Pod is a brilliant story of teamwork and the courage to succeed. Rebecca Lisle once again takes us on a journey to the stone age with her brilliant characters and storylines. Teamed with illustrator, Richard Watson, they have created a fantastic picture book that brings the animals to life and captures the mischievous Nim doing her best to get Pod into trouble. A must for every bookshelf, would make a brilliant book for siblings to read together.’

Thank you!
Read the full review here and buy a copy here! 

Read More
Media

‘I recommend that you read it for yourselves to see if it gets your foot tapping.’ A MOOsical review from The Letterpress Project

Karen from The Letterpress Project has recently had her feet tapping away reading The MOOsic Makers by Heather Pindar with illustrations by Barbara Bakos:

‘This is another triumph for Maverick Books, a publisher who pride themselves on producing well-paced picture books with an emphasis on memorable text and plentiful vibrant illustrations. I really enjoyed this unusual   ‘can do’ story with its underlying messages of optimism, creativity and working together. The way in which making music is used as a solution to a difficult problem is also something that would start some interesting discussions with children, as well as giving food for thought to adults who may not see it as a priority. It might even lead to a reason to listen to lots of different Blue Grass and Disco music which surely can’t be bad.

I recommend that you read it for yourselves to see if it gets your foot tapping.’

A MOOhosive thank you!
Read the full review here and buy a copy here!

Read More
Media

‘An original take on a pirate story.’ Madge Eekal reviews The Pirate Who Lost His Name

Thank you Madge Eekal Reviews for giving such an ARRGHmazing review of The Pirate Who Lost His Name by Lou Treleaven with illustrations by Genie Espinosa:

‘An original take on a pirate story. This book’s wacky humour that will appeal to children of picture book age.

I’ve now read a few books from Maverick by Lou Treleaven and her wacky imagination almost always appeals. In this story she doesn’t disappoint introducing us to a group of pirates with some truly wonderful names.

The pictures are very bright and colourful with all the stereotypical requirements for a pirate picture book – a peg leg, eyepatch, parrot, spotted headdress, tricorn hat, hammock etc. All the characters are appealing and I chuckled at the images of the screaming fans that seem to follow Captain Dreamboat everywhere. My favourite has to be the illustrations of the wonderfully expressive green parrot who appears on every page wearing a pirate hat.’

Thank you! Read the full review here and buy a copy here!

Read More
Media

‘a great little story that will keep young MOOsic lovers a-MOO-sed at bedtime’ an UDDERly FARMtastic review by What’s Good To Read

What’s Good To Read recently enjoyed reading Heather Pindar‘s new picture book The MOOsic Makers with illustrations by Barbara Barkos:

‘Heather Pindar has written a delightful story about musical animals and where the cows have to change their tune more than once to achieve their goal. It has a great use of word play and silly cow puns that keeps the reader (adult and children) entertained.

The story has many layers with underlying tones of helpfulness, selfishness, teamwork and naivety.

It has a good lesson in morals that you can explore further with the kids, should you want to and does create lots of talking points.

The MOOsic Makers is a great little story that will keep young MOOsic lovers a-MOO-sed at bedtime (sorry I couldn’t help but continue with cow puns).’

Thank you! Read the full pun-induced review here and buy a copy here!

Read More
1 2 3 4 5 112